Cycling Accidents
What you should do if you are a cyclist involved in an accident

Usually cyclists don’t have insurance and they are not required by law to have insurance.
If you are injured in a cycling accident, it is possible to bring a claim in PIAB for
compensation against the driver of the vehicle.
If there is some other cause of the accident such as for example, the condition of the road or
an animal unexpectedly crossing your path, you would have to name in the relevant party in
the proceedings.
We have had situations where drivers have driven off without stopping following a collision
with a cyclist. In these situations, it is still possible to bring a claim and we have issued
proceedings against the Motor Insurer’s Bureau of Ireland where the driver of the vehicle is
uninsured or cannot be traced.
There is no legal obligation to wear a helmet while cycling in Ireland but there may be an
element of contributory negligence against you if you injure your head while not wearing a
helmet. It is similar to not wearing a seat belt. This would also apply if you did not have
lights on your bike or you were not wearing HiVis or if your brakes didn’t work! We would
recommend in every case that your bike is properly serviced and you have good lights.
In Ireland, a claimant has two years from the date of the accident to submit a claim to PIAB,
the Personal Injuries Assessment Board otherwise the claim is statute barred.
You should speak to your solicitor as soon as possible after an accident to ensure that your
interests are protected and to allow you to make an informed decision how best to proceed.
If you have any queries arising out of this article, please do not hesitate to call our office to
speak to one of our solicitors at 061 314 948 or email info@tynanodonovansolicitors.ie
The contents of this article is for information purposes only and is not to be construed as legal
advice. In contentious business, solicitors may not calculate fees as a percentage of any award
or settlement.

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